The English Lavender Farm LLC, 8040 Thompson Creek Road, Applegate, Oregon 97530
Our Farm is set on a gently sloping hillside. That gentle slope can be a challenge for some because it does seem to go on forever on a hot day. The beauty of the hill is that when you’re at the top you can see nothing but lavender and breathtaking views for miles. We initially planted five varieties of English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia); and we have planted more each year including a few French lavenders (Lavandins) in the flower beds around the barn and along the drive. The neat rows of English lavender have different appearances at various times of the year; sometimes they’re silvery, others they’re bright green and then of course purple and blue; but they always look quite spectacular. We usually start seeing purple in the field in late May but the predominant color then is still the green foliage. As we move into June the purple wash gains traction and the dusting of purple moves from the tops of the stems down to the ground as a riot of color dominates into the middle of June. From mid June until the middle of July the color of all of our plants is striking. From the middle of July until the end of the month the color becomes gradually more muted until the end of July. We open in June and July because those are the flowering months but the strongest color is usually found in late June. Harvesting our lavender takes hundreds of woman-hours. It is for that reason that we begin harvesting as early as we can and sometimes we harvest the first culinary lavender just before our first festival. The harvest continues through the summer months with a large push at the end of July to get the harvest in before the color turns to a more muted purple.
Welcome to our home. We're Sue and Derek Owen and in 2011 we started building a new life as lavender farmers in Southern Oregon. If you're looking for a place to spend the day in the Applegate valley then please come and visit. We're open in June and July each year from 10:00am until 4:00pm from Friday through Monday. From Tuesday to Thursday we're closed while we tend the fields, go to farmers markets and make products for our gift shop. We look forward to seeing you in our back-yard in the near future.
We are members of the Southern Oregon Lavender Trail – a group of local lavender farmers who have created a unique attraction in the Applegate valley with a variety of events and lavender inspired products available at each farm. We started as a group of six venues but at this point have hrunk to just three. But things are changing and we will soon be welcoming new members to our group! Stay tuned.
We don't use chemicals or pesticides in our fields and our products are as natural as possible. We feed the lavender with Epsom salts in the spring and fall but by-and-large lavender seems to do well left to its own devices. We distill lavender oil in our copper still and this begins as soon as we start picking lavender each year. When all of the lavender is harvested and hung in the barn and the fields have become green again, the more attractive lavender bouquets are sorted, wrapped and boxed for the following year and the less attractive stems are either de-budded or distilled. We distill our own lavender. Its a slow process and with a small still it takes hours for each run. To clear the barn at the end of the season takes months. But the time it takes is kind of part of the process. When the lavender is fresh from the field we take the bunches and lop off the flowering end of the bunch. All of the oil is in the lavender buds. There is no oil in the leaves, the stems or even the little flowers (coronets) that burst out of the buds. We have heard that the flowers and stems have lavender oil in them but our attempts to distill just those parts have always resulted in not a single drop of oil. So the flowering ends of the stems fill a large stainless steel perforated drum and that drum, when packed with flowering stems, goes into the still. We bolt the top down with some very large thumb screws and begin the process. We use electric heat to boil the water and our glass essencier separates oil from water. We dont actually sell hydrosol. We used to, but so many people brought it back to us saying that they thought it would smell more like lavender oil, that we decided to discontinue sales. Instead, if you would like to bring a suitable container when you come to the farm we will happily fill it with the fresh hydrosol being produced that day at no charge.
Throughout June and July we hold wreath making classes at the farm. For a fee of $45 you can sit down under the shade and our talented and ever-so-charming instructor Sharon will impart her wreath making knowlege with good humor and a glass of lavender lemonaide. The results are impressive to say the least. obviously there is little chance of running out of fresh lavender as we are always available to cut more for the class if the students get a little carried away.

Wreath Making

Paint & Sip

There is an old addage that says if something sounds too good to be true then it probably is… Paint and Sip sounds that way but it really is a thing! Come and see us in the evening, after the visitors are gone and a local artist will sit with a small group and demonstrate how to paint in acrylics. Its a bit more interperative than paint by numbers but its way more fun than rocket surgery! A selection of local wines an nibbles are on hand to feed your hidden creative side. Bookings for this year will be available here on the site very soon.

Dinner in the Lavender

Our first dinner was in June 2018 and it was incredible! There is something entirely surreal about dining in the middle of a field of Lavender! We had intended to tread lightly and have one dinner in June and a second in July in 2018. Sadly, smoke from wildfires put an end to our dining season after the first event. In 2019 we intend to have several dinners in June and perhaps one early in July, just in case there is a repeat of last years poor air quality. The incedible food was by Truffle Pig Craft Kitchen with amazing wine paring for each course by Awen, a combination that delighted our diners and which we hope will be repeated this year.

Our Farm

Folgate One of the better Angustifolia oil producers and is considered the best for producing high-yield crops for culinary use. Folgate is a small bush with narrow, small leaves and a sweet aroma. If you like cooking with lavender or enjoy the sweet smell in potpourri and sachets you will love this plant. Hidcote Hidcote Lavender has long been one of the most sought after Lavandula Angustifolia varieties and is one of the darkest and shortest of the Lavandula Angustifolia group. Often propagated by seed that does not come true to the original plant, it can be very difficult to locate the proper dark purple Hidcote Lavender. Our Hidcote plants are always propagated by cuttings so their characteristics remain true to the original plant. Sharon Roberts Sharon Roberts is a medium size bushy plant containing green foliage and dark purple/blue flowers. It is suitable for ornamental hedging because it has a long blooming period and a strong fragrance. This variety is an excellent choice when making fresh bundles. Buena Vista A slow-growing lavender that is excellent for use in baking. This lavender variety blooms twice per year – once in the late spring and again in fall in areas with long growing seasons and mild weather. Buena Vista has a strong fragrance, distinctive and very dark blue calyxes and lighter blue flowers. Royal Velvet This variety is a small to medium-sized plant. It is one of the best Lavandula Angustifolias. Its deep purple flowers and foliage are highly aromatic. It is a great oil producer and excellent for baking. Royal Velvet is an all-purpose plant that is one of the most popular lavenders currently.
Tuckers Early A variety introduced by Tom DeBaggio and is a cross between two lavender varieties - Mitcham Grey and Two Seasons. It features dark flower buds and blue flowers which bloom throughout the summer. It is one of the earliest lavenders to bloom and the last to finish. It makes a great container plant and is highly fragrant. Grosso Not an English Lavender but an X-Intermedia this cultivar has one of the darkest violet colors among the lavandins and is excellent for fresh or dried bouquets. Its neat abundant growth habit and second bloom in autumn make it a great all-around plant and one of the most popular lavenders. The scent of the lavandins is not as sweet as the Angustifolias but it yields around six times more essential oil! While we don't extract oils from "French" lavender we do use this variety in our lavender sachets and all of our heat-able products along with flax seed. You wont find this growning in the field here on the farm but we do hve it growing along the driveway as you enter the proprty and at the front gate. Melissa We selected Melissa because of its pretty pink color which we feel offsets the blues and purples beautifully. Melissa is often used for culinary purposes and some might say it has a peppery flavor that goes really well in savory dishes. Betty's BlueBetty's Blue was introduced to the farm in 2015. It is a great crafting variety because of its deep blue color and tight flower heads. We think this is going to be a firm favorite.
The history of Lavender sometimes seems fluid with dates and events changing with the seasons and the telling. Here on the farm we read what we can and share the stories that explain and entertain. If you are interested in the history of this beloved and revered herb, please browse our history of lavender page. Click the button on the right for more… If you are looking for more lavender history as well as other lavender information then please click the Wikipedia button on the right.

Lavender

Shop

As you can imagine, there is no shortage of pictures of our farm. In the middle of summer thousands of people take pictures in the field. Below are a few of our own favorites and some links through to some local photographers with examples of their work here on the farm.
A few pictures from the summer
And a few from the winter
Some of Cooper (of course)
And a few of us!
Lastly… A few of how it all started

Gallery

The Rogue Valley never seems bigger than when you have to drive from one side to the other. To make our products more accessible we bring our products to you, or rather to your local farmers and growers markets. The table below will let you know what is going on and when we will be in your neck of the woods for markets or shows. It also lists the two lavender festivals we have each year here on the farm, in June and July.
The map below might be useful if you are trying to find us. GPS systems often direct travelers to an address which is a mile or two short of where we are. The entrance to the farm is at 8040 Thompson Creek, Applegate, Oregon 97530. For the more technically minded we can be found at: Latitude: 42.15983 Longitude: -123.23611800000003

Where to find us

Lavender Varieties Grown On The Farm

Contact Us The History of Lavender The History of Lavender Contact Us
The English Lavender Farm LLC, 8040 Thompson Creek Road, Applegate, Oregon 97530
Our Farm is set on a gently sloping hillside. That gentle slope can be a challenge for some because it does seem to go on forever on a hot day. The beauty of the hill is that when you’re at the top you can see nothing but lavender and breathtaking views for miles. We initially planted five varieties of English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia); and we have planted more each year including a few French lavenders (Lavandins) in the flower beds around the barn and along the drive. The neat rows of English lavender have different appearances at various times of the year; sometimes they’re silvery, others they’re bright green and then of course purple and blue; but they always look quite spectacular. We usually start seeing purple in the field in late May but the predominant color then is still the green foliage. As we move into June the purple wash gains traction and the dusting of purple moves from the tops of the stems down to the ground as a riot of color dominates into the middle of June. From mid June until the middle of July the color of all of our plants is striking. From the middle of July until the end of the month the color becomes gradually more muted until the end of July. We open in June and July because those are the flowering months but the strongest color is usually found in late June. Harvesting our lavender takes hundreds of woman-hours. It is for that reason that we begin harvesting as early as we can and sometimes we harvest the first culinary lavender just before our first festival. The harvest continues through the summer months with a large push at the end of July to get the harvest in before the color turns to a more muted purple.
Welcome to our home. We're Sue and Derek Owen and in 2011 we started building a new life as lavender farmers in Southern Oregon. If you're looking for a place to spend the day in the Applegate valley then please come and visit. We're open in June and July each year from 10:00am until 4:00pm from Friday through Monday. From Tuesday to Thursday we're closed while we tend the fields, go to farmers markets and make products for our gift shop. We look forward to seeing you in our back-yard in the near future.
We are members of the Southern Oregon Lavender Trail – a group of local lavender farmers who have created a unique attraction in the Applegate valley with a variety of events and lavender inspired products available at each farm. We started as a group of six venues but at this point have hrunk to just three. But things are changing and we will soon be welcoming new members to our group! Stay tuned.
We don't use chemicals or pesticides in our fields and our products are as natural as possible. We feed the lavender with Epsom salts in the spring and fall but by-and-large lavender seems to do well left to its own devices. We distill lavender oil in our copper still and this begins as soon as we start picking lavender each year. When all of the lavender is harvested and hung in the barn and the fields have become green again, the more attractive lavender bouquets are sorted, wrapped and boxed for the following year and the less attractive stems are either de-budded or distilled. We distill our own lavender. Its a slow process and with a small still it takes hours for each run. To clear the barn at the end of the season takes months. But the time it takes is kind of part of the process. When the lavender is fresh from the field we take the bunches and lop off the flowering end of the bunch. All of the oil is in the lavender buds. There is no oil in the leaves, the stems or even the little flowers (coronets) that burst out of the buds. We have heard that the flowers and stems have lavender oil in them but our attempts to distill just those parts have always resulted in not a single drop of oil. So the flowering ends of the stems fill a large stainless steel perforated drum and that drum, when packed with flowering stems, goes into the still. We bolt the top down with some very large thumb screws and begin the process. We use electric heat to boil the water and our glass essencier separates oil from water. We dont actually sell hydrosol. We used to, but so many people brought it back to us saying that they thought it would smell more like lavender oil, that we decided to discontinue sales. Instead, if you would like to bring a suitable container when you come to the farm we will happily fill it with the fresh hydrosol being produced that day at no charge.
Throughout June and July we hold wreath making classes at the farm. For a fee of $45 you can sit down under the shade and our talented and ever-so- charming instructor Sharon will impart her wreath making knowlege with good humor and a glass of lavender lemonaide. The results are impressive to say the least. obviously there is little chance of running out of fresh lavender as we are always available to cut more for the class if the students get a little carried away.

Wreath Making

Paint & Sip

There is an old addage that says if something sounds too good to be true then it probably is… Paint and Sip sounds that way but it really is a thing! Come and see us in the evening, after the visitors are gone and a local artist will sit with a small group and demonstrate how to paint in acrylics. Its a bit more interperative than paint by numbers but its way more fun than rocket surgery! A selection of local wines an nibbles are on hand to feed your hidden creative side. Bookings for this year will be available here on the site very soon.

Dinner in the Lavender

Our first dinner was in June 2018 and it was incredible! There is something entirely surreal about dining in the middle of a field of Lavender! We had intended to tread lightly and have one dinner in June and a second in July in 2018. Sadly, smoke from wildfires put an end to our dining season after the first event. In 2019 we intend to have several dinners in June and perhaps one early in July, just in case there is a repeat of last years poor air quality. The incedible food was by Truffle Pig Craft Kitchen with amazing wine paring for each course by Awen, a combination that delighted our diners and which we hope will be repeated this year.

Our Farm

Folgate One of the better Angustifolia oil producers and is considered the best for producing high-yield crops for culinary use. Folgate is a small bush with narrow, small leaves and a sweet aroma. If you like cooking with lavender or enjoy the sweet smell in potpourri and sachets you will love this plant. Hidcote Hidcote Lavender has long been one of the most sought after Lavandula Angustifolia varieties and is one of the darkest and shortest of the Lavandula Angustifolia group. Often propagated by seed that does not come true to the original plant, it can be very difficult to locate the proper dark purple Hidcote Lavender. Our Hidcote plants are always propagated by cuttings so their characteristics remain true to the original plant. Sharon Roberts Sharon Roberts is a medium size bushy plant containing green foliage and dark purple/blue flowers. It is suitable for ornamental hedging because it has a long blooming period and a strong fragrance. This variety is an excellent choice when making fresh bundles. Buena Vista A slow-growing lavender that is excellent for use in baking. This lavender variety blooms twice per year – once in the late spring and again in fall in areas with long growing seasons and mild weather. Buena Vista has a strong fragrance, distinctive and very dark blue calyxes and lighter blue flowers. Royal Velvet This variety is a small to medium-sized plant. It is one of the best Lavandula Angustifolias. Its deep purple flowers and foliage are highly aromatic. It is a great oil producer and excellent for baking. Royal Velvet is an all-purpose plant that is one of the most popular lavenders currently. Tuckers Early A variety introduced by Tom DeBaggio and is a cross between two lavender varieties - Mitcham Grey and Two Seasons. It features dark flower buds and blue flowers which bloom throughout the summer. It is one of the earliest lavenders to bloom and the last to finish. It makes a great container plant and is highly fragrant. Grosso Not an English Lavender but an X-Intermedia this cultivar has one of the darkest violet colors among the lavandins and is excellent for fresh or dried bouquets. Its neat abundant growth habit and second bloom in autumn make it a great all-around plant and one of the most popular lavenders. The scent of the lavandins is not as sweet as the Angustifolias but it yields around six times more essential oil! While we don't extract oils from "French" lavender we do use this variety in our lavender sachets and all of our heat-able products along with flax seed. You wont find this growning in the field here on the farm but we do hve it growing along the driveway as you enter the proprty and at the front gate. Melissa We selected Melissa because of its pretty pink color which we feel offsets the blues and purples beautifully. Melissa is often used for culinary purposes and some might say it has a peppery flavor that goes really well in savory dishes. Betty's BlueBetty's Blue was introduced to the farm in 2015. It is a great crafting variety because of its deep blue color and tight flower heads. We think this is going to be a firm favorite.
The history of Lavender sometimes seems fluid with dates and events changing with the seasons and the telling. Here on the farm we read what we can and share the stories that explain and entertain. If you are interested in the history of this beloved and revered herb, please browse our history of lavender page. Click the button on the right for more… If you are looking for more lavender history as well as other lavender information then please click the Wikipedia button on the right.

Lavender

Shop

As you can imagine, there is no shortage of pictures of our farm. In the middle of summer thousands of people take pictures in the field. Below are a few of our own favorites and some links through to some local photographers with examples of their work here on the farm.
A few pictures from the summer
And a few from the winter
Some of Cooper (of course)
And a few of us!
Lastly… A few of how it all started

Gallery

The Rogue Valley never seems bigger than when you have to drive from one side to the other. To make our products more accessible we bring our products to you, or rather to your local farmers and growers markets. The table below will let you know what is going on and when we will be in your neck of the woods for markets or shows. It also lists the two lavender festivals we have each year here on the farm, in June and July.
The map below might be useful if you are trying to find us. GPS systems often direct travelers to an address which is a mile or two short of where we are. The entrance to the farm is at 8040 Thompson Creek, Applegate, Oregon 97530. For the more technically minded we can be found at: Latitude: 42.15983 Longitude: -123.23611800000003

Where to find us

Lavender Varieties Grown On The Farm

Contact Us
The History of Lavender The History of Lavender